“Living in the Interval” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, January 9, 2022

Gathering Music (begins at 9:50)

Welcome and Introductions (Martha Larson, co-chair of Sunday Services Committee)

Announcements (Sande Hartdagen, member Sunday Services Committee)

Centering (Martha)

Prelude

“We Three Kings”
arranged and performed by Anya Stolzman

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words
#434 in Singing the Living Tradition 

May we be reminded here of our highest aspirations,
and inspired to bring our gifts of love and service to the altar of humanity.
May we know once again that we are not isolated beings
but connected in mystery and miracle, to the universe,
to this community, and to each other.
Anonymous

Opening Hymn

“Dark of Winter”
Words and music by Shelley Jackson Denham
#55 in Singing the Living Tradition
Led by Martha Larson

Dark of winter, soft and still, your quiet calm surrounds me.
Let my thoughts go where they will; ease my mind profoundly.
And then my soul will sing a song, a blessed song of love eternal.
Gentle darkness, soft and still, bring your quiet to me.

Darkness, soothe my weary eyes, that I may see more clearly.
When my heart with sorrow cries, comfort and caress me.
And then my soul may hear a voice, a still small voice of love eternal.
Darkness when my fears arise, let your peace flow through me.

Joys and Concerns

Musical Interlude

Prayer
Written by Rev. Joshua Pawelek
Read by Martha Larson

A Prayer for Healing

Spirit of Life, source of love and comfort:
We pray for the wounded, those who’ve experienced the pain and trauma of domestic violence. We pray that they may find:
The respite of safe haven, and a loving, supportive community,
The capacity to name what has happened,
The patience to remain on the long path of healing,
The courage to do what is necessary to ensure a safe future
for themselves and their children.

We pray for those who would perpetrate violence. We pray that they may find:
Support for making positive life changes,
A willingness to take responsibility for their past and future actions,
The resolve to atone,
The wisdom to meet frustrations and fears not with anger
but with calm, tender acceptance.

We pray for our wider community. We pray that all may find:
Agreement that domestic violence is unacceptable,
Commitment to marshaling public and private resources to address the root
causes of such violence,
Compassion for all those caught in the cycle of violence,
Love, to sustain us all in building a safer, more just, more
caring world.

Musical Meditation   

Offering

The recipient of our January Community Outreach Offering is the Connecticut Domestic Worker Justice Campaign. Domestic workers (house cleaners, personal care attendants, nannies, etc.) remain one of the most exploited and exploitable classes of workers in the country. Connecticut’s Domestic Worker Justice Campaign advocates for labor rights, workplace protections, and training for domestic workers. The campaign’s long-term goal is to pass an enforceable Domestic Worker Bill of Rights in our state. Organizations who participate in the campaign include the CT Workers Center, Unidad Latina en Accion, the Naugatuck Valley Project, United Action of Southeastern CT, Comunidades Sin Fronteras, the Hartford Catholic Archdiocese Office for Social Justice, and a number of congregations, including UUS:E.

Offering Music

“What Wondrous Love is This?’
Southern folk hymn, arr. by Mary Bopp

Reading

“Survivorship”
By Rev. Theresa Inez Soto

Message by Mary-Jane Foster,  CEO and President of Interval House

Closing Hymn

“Comfort Me”
Words and music by Mimi Bornstein-Doble
#1002 in Singing the Journey

Comfort me, comfort me, comfort me, oh my soul.
Comfort me, comfort me, comfort me, oh my soul

Sing with me, sing with me, sing with me, oh my soul.
Sing with me, sing with me, sing with me, oh my soul.

Speak for me…..

Dance with me….

Comfort me……

Extinguishing the Chalice

Closing Circle

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Postlude

Breakout Rooms

Our guest speaker, Mary-Jane Foster, became the CEO and President of Hartford’s Interval House in January of 2017. Interval House is Connecticut’s largest domestic violence agency and in 2021 celebrates 44 years of service.  Foster is just the second CEO of the agency.  She served as Vice-President of University Relations at the University of Bridgeport, from May 2009 until June of 2016.  She is an attorney admitted to practice in Connecticut and New York.  She is a co-founder and former co-owner and CEO of the Bridgeport Bluefish Professional Baseball Club and Westchester Baseball, LLC.  Ms. Foster was a candidate for mayor of Bridgeport in the 2011 Democratic primary and the 2015 general election.

Prior to the founding of the Bridgeport Bluefish, Ms. Foster attended Quinnipiac College School of Law.  She was awarded a Juris Doctor degree with honors in May 1995.  Her Juris Doctor degree was a logical extension of her several years of volunteer work within the regional Bridgeport community.  Her field of practice was family law.

Before attending law school, Ms. Foster was an actress in New York.  She has performed on stage, film, television, and radio and has appeared in over two hundred television and radio commercials.

 

 

 

 

“On Setting Our Intentions” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, January 2, 2022

Gathering Music (begins at 10:50)

Excerpts from “Largo” from New World Symphony
By Antonín Dvorák
Performed by Dorothy Bognar

Welcome and Announcements

Centering

Prelude

“Homeward Bound”
By Paul Simon
Arranged and performed by Dorothy Bognar

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

“This is the Home That Love Made”
ad. from Amanda Poppei
Spoken by Rev. Josh Pawelek

Opening Hymn

“May Nothing Evil Cross This Door”
Words by Louis Untermeyer, music by Robert N. Quaile
#1 in Singing the Living Tradition
Led by Rev. Josh Pawelek

May nothing evil cross this door,
and may ill fortune never pry about
these windows; may the roar
and rain go by.

By faith made strong, the rafters will
withstand the battering of the storm.
This hearth, though all the world grow chill,
will keep you warm.

 Peace shall walk softly through these rooms,
touching our lips with holy wine,
till every casual corner blooms
into a shrine.

With laughter drown the raucous shout,
and, though these sheltering walls are thin,
may they be strong to keep hate out
and hold love in.

Reading “Unitarian Universalist Association Principles”

Leader: We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote:

The inherent worth and dignity of every person

Congregation: Each person is important.

Leader:  Justice, equity and compassion in human relations

Congregation: Be kind in all you do.

Leader: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

Congregation: We’re free to learn together.

Leader: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

Congregation: We can search for what is true.

Leader: The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large

Congregation: All people need a voice.

Leader: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all.

Congregation: Build a fair and peaceful world.

Leader: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part

Congregation: We care for the Earth.

Musical Meditation

Joys, Concerns, and Introductions

Musical Meditation

Offering

The recipient of our January Community Outreach Offering is the Connecticut Domestic Worker Justice Campaign. Domestic workers (house cleaners, personal care attendants, nannies, etc.) remain one of the most exploited and exploitable classes of workers in the country. Connecticut’s Domestic Worker Justice Campaign advocates for labor rights, workplace protections, and training for domestic workers. The campaign’s long-term goal is to pass an enforceable Domestic Worker Bill of Rights in our state. Organizations who participate in the campaign include the CT Workers Center, Unidad Latina en Accion, the Naugatuck Valley Project, United Action of Southeastern CT, Comunidades Sin Fronteras, the Hartford Catholic Archdiocese Office for Social Justice, and a number of congregations, including UUS:E.

Offering Music

“The Homecoming”
By Hagood Hardy; arr. by Dan Coates
Performed by Dorothy Bognar

Sermon

“On Setting Our Intentions”
Rev. Josh Pawelek

Closing Hymn

“Blue Boat Home”
words by Peter Mayer
music by Roland Hugh Prichard; ad. by Peter Mayer; arr. by Dorothy Bognar
#1064 in Singing the Journey
Led by Rev. Josh Pawelek

Though below me, I feel no motion standing on these mountains and plains.
Far away from the rolling ocean still my dry land heart can say:
I’ve been sailing all my life now, never harbor or port have I known.
The wide universe is the ocean I travel and the earth is my blue boat home.

Sun my sail and moon my rudder as I ply the starry sea,
leaning over the edge in wonder, casting questions into the deep.
Drifting here with my ship’s companions, all we kindred pilgrim souls,
making our way by the lights of the heavens in our beautiful blue boat home.

I give thanks to the waves up holding me, hail the great winds urging me on,
greet the infinite sea before me, sing the sky my sailor’s song:
I was born up on the fathoms, never harbor or port have I known.
The wide universe is the ocean I travel, and the earth is my blue boat home.

Extinguishing the Chalice

Closing Circle

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Postlude 

“Take Me Home, Country Roads”
By Bill Danoff, Taff Nivert, John Denver

Musical Note: Bill Danoff was from Springfield, MA. One night, following a show with John Denver, he and Taff Nivert came up with the initial plans for this song.  At first it was not tied to West Virginia, but rather to the meandering country roads Danoff remembered from his childhood in central and western Massachusetts.

“Silent Night, Holy Night” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, December 24, 2021, 7:00 P.M.

Gathering Music

“Blue Christmas”
written by Billy Hayes and Jay W. Johnson
Performed by Sandy Johnson and Dan Thompson

Prelude

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel”
Latin c. 9th century
Performed by Peggy and David Webbe

Welcome (Gina Campellone)

Centering (Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Musical Invocation

“We Wish You a Merry Christmas”
Trad. English carol
Performed by The String Sisters

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

“Reflections on the Resurgence of Joy”
By Dori Jeanine Somers
Spoken by Rev. Josh Pawelek

Opening Hymn

“Joy to the World”
Music by George Frederic Handel, text by Isaac Watts
Led by Jeannine Westbrook

Joy to the world! The Lord is come
Let earth receive her King!
Let every heart prepare Him room
And heaven and nature sing
And heaven and nature sing
And heaven, and heaven and nature sing.

Joy to the world! The Savior reigns
Let men their songs employ
While fields and floods
Rocks, hills and plains
Repeat the sounding joy
Repeat the sounding joy
Repeat, repeat the sounding joy.

He rules the world with truth and grace
And makes the nations prove
The glories of His righteousness
And wonders of His love
And wonders of His love
And wonders of His love.

Christmas Pageant

Music

“Wexford Carol”
Performed by Janet Desmarais; audiovisual arrangement by Dan Thompson
Trad. Irish carol; arr. by Dorothea Baker

Christmas Prayer (Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Music

“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”
Written by Felix Mendelssohn
Performed by Anya Stolzman

Offering for the UUS:E’s Minister’s Discretionary Fund

Offering Music

“O, Holy Night”
Written by Adolphe Adam
Performed by Jeannine Westbrook

Homily (Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Carols (led by Jeannine Westbrook)

“The First Noel”
English carol
Words by Edmund Hamilton Sears
Music by Richard Storrs Willis

The First Noel, the angels did say
Was to certain poor shepherds in fields as they lay
In fields where they lay keeping their sheep
On a cold winter’s night that was so deep
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel
Born is the King of Israel!

They looked up and saw a star
Shining in the East beyond them far
And to the earth it gave great light
And so it continued both day and night
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel
Born is the King of Israel!

And by the light of that same star
Three wise men came from country far;
To see a king was their intent,
And to follow the star wherever it went.
Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel
Born is the King of Israel!

“In the Bleak Midwinter”
Words ad. by John Andrew Storey from Georgina Rosetti
Music by Gustav Theodore Holst

In the bleak mid-winter
Frosty wind made moan,
Earth stood hard as iron,
Water like a stone;
Snow had fallen, snow on snow,
Snow on snow,
In the bleak mid-winter
Long ago.

Christ a homeless stranger,
So the gospels say,
Cradle in a manger
And a bed of hay.
In the bleak mid-winter
Stable-place sufficed,
Mary and her baby,
Jesus Christ.

Once more mother and child
Weave their magic spell,
Touching hearts with wonder
Words can never tell
In the bleak mid-winter,
In this world of pain,
Where our hearts are open
Love is born again.

It Came Upon the Midnight Clear

It came upon the midnight clear,
That glorious song of old
From angels bending near the earth
To touch their harps of gold!
Peace on the earth, good will to men,
From heaven’s all gracious King!
The world in solemn stillness lay
To hear the angels sing.

Still through the cloven skies they come
With peaceful wings unfurled
And still their heavenly music floats
O’er all the wearly world;
Above its sad and lowly plains
They bend on hovering wing.
And ever o’er its Babel sounds
The blessed angels sing.

Yet with the woes of sin and strife
The world hath suffered long;
Beneath the angel-strain have rolled
Two thousand years of wrong;
And man, at war with man, hears not
The love song which they bring:
Oh hush the noise, ye men of strife,
And hear the angels sing.

For lo! the days are hastening on,
By prophet bards foretold,
When, with the ever-circling years,
Shall come the Age of Gold;
When peace shall over all the earth
Its ancient splendors fling,
And all the world give back the song
Which now the angels sing.

“Silent Night, Holy Night”
Words by Joseph Mohr
Music by Franz Xaver Gruber

Silent night, holy night!
All is calm, all is bright.
Round yon Virgin, Mother and Child
Holy infant so tender and mild,
Sleep in heavenly peace,
Sleep in heavenly peace.

Silent night, holy night!
Shepherds quake at the sight.
Glories stream from heaven afar
Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia,
Christ the Savior is born!
Christ the Savior is born.

Silent night, holy night!
Son of God love’s pure light.
Radiant beams from Thy holy face
With the dawn of redeeming grace,
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth.

Extinguishing the Chalice

Postlude

 

 

 

 

“Tell Me a Story” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, November 7, 2021

Gathering Music (Mary Bopp, Director of Music) begins at 9:50

Welcome and Announcements (Stacey Musulin, member Sunday Services Committee)

Introduction of the Service  (Martha Larson, co-chair Sunday Services Committee)

Centering (Martha Larson)

Prelude

“Adagio Covidia”
by David Larson
performed by Mary Bopp and Peggy Webbe

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words (spoken by Anya Stolzman)

“We inherit this free faith from the brave and gentle”
by Audette Fulbright Fulson

This light we kindle is set in the lamp of our history.
We inherit this free faith from the brave and gentle,
fierce and outspoken hearts and minds that have come before us.
Let us be worthy inheritors of this faith and through our good works,
pass it boldly to a new generation.

Opening Hymn

“Here We Have Gathered” verses 1 and 2
words: Alicia S. Carpenter; music: Genevan psalter 1543
#360 in Singing the Living Tradition

Here we have gathered, gathered side by side;
circle of kinship, come and step inside!
May all who seek here find a kindly word;
may all who speak here feel they have been heard.
Sing now together this, our heart’s own song.

Here we have gathered, called to celebrate
days of our lifetime, matters small and great:
we of all ages, women, children, men,
infants and sages, sharing what we can.
Sing now together this, our heart’s own song.

Story:  The Granddaughter Necklace by Sharon Dennis Wyeth
Illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline; read by Stacey Musulin

Musical Response

First Question:  Martha introduces Vera’s question and Christina’s response, then Priscilla’s

Joys and Concerns (Stacey Musulin)

Musical Response

Offering (Martha Larson)

For the month of November, our community outreach offering is dedicated to Manchester Senior, Adult, and Family Services.

Offering Music

“From Grandmother to Mother”
written by Jeannette LeSure
sung by Jeannette and friends
produced by Dan Thompson

Youth Questions with Elder Answers  (Introduced by Martha)

Casey Campellone, Anya Stolzman, Christina Bailey, Janet Heller, Priscilla Squires, Fred Wildes, Ellen Williams

Concluding Remarks (Stacey Musulin)

Closing Hymn

“We Are Dancing Sarah’s Circle”
words: Carole A. Etzler; music: African American Spiritual
#212 in Singing the Living Tradition

We are dancing Sarah’s circle,
We are dancing Sarah’s circle,
We are dancing Sarah’s circle,
Sisters, brothers, all.

Here we seek and find our history (3 times)
Sisters, brothers, all.

We will all do our own naming (3 times)
Sisters, brothers, all.

Every round a generation (3 times)
Sisters, brothers, all.

On and on the circle’s moving (3 times)
Sisters, brothers, all.

Extinguishing the Chalice and Closing Words (Casey Campellone)
by Brian Kiely

The Chalice is now extinguished,
but its light lives on in the minds and hearts and souls of each one of you.
Carry that flame with you as you leave this place and share it
with those you know
with those you love
and most especially, with those you have yet to meet.

Closing Circle (Anya Stolzman)

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Postlude

Virtual Coffee Hour / Zoom Breakout Rooms

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 — October 13, 2021

  “Shared expectations lead to predictability.”

381. Experts warn it’s that time of year to get a flu shot

         QWill it be like last year when few people came down with the flu?

         A:  Probably not.  Last year, as the pandemic was surging and before vaccines were available, the public was getting used to mitigation measures including lockdowns, wearing masks, hand washing and social distancing.  An unexpected benefit of these measures was that the seasonal flu was also constrained.  The number of flu cases in the 2020-2021 season was the lowest in the last 23 years.  Like Covid-19, influenza is a respiratory infection transmitted through the air.  This year, with many states loosening their mitigation measures for Covid, the flu is easier to pass along.  “This year we are guaranteed to have the flu, and we are going to have some version of a ‘twindemic,’” said William Schaffner, MD, the medical director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.  “It could really further strain an already extraordinarily stretched, tired-to-the-bone health care system.”

Clarification of several concerns about flu have been offered by infection control experts:

  • Everyone over the age of 6 months, with a few exceptions, should get the flu shot.
  • The flu runs from October through May. Now is the time to be vaccinated.
  • It takes about 2 weeks after getting a flu shot before immunity is established.
  • Both the Covid-19 vaccine and the flu vaccine are needed to avoid this “twindemic.”
  • You can get both vaccines at the same time.
  • Children and pregnant women should get the flu vaccine.
  • Immunity is transferred through the placenta to the unborn child.
  • Antibiotics are not effective against either Covid-19 or seasonal influenza.

Dr. Schaffner stated the coronavirus and influenza viruses causing illness have one thing in common: “We can’t shut it off like a light switch.  But we can dim it.”

382. More than 120,000 American children lost a parent or caregiver to Covid-19

         Q: How many American children have lost a parent due to the pandemic?

         A:  Last Thursday, the medical journal Pediatrics published a study that found the number of U.S. children orphaned may be larger than previously estimated, and that the toll has been far greater among Black and Hispanic Americans.  One of the study’s authors, Alexandra Blenkinsop, MD, of Imperial College London said in a recent statement, “These findings really highlight those children who have been left most vulnerable by the pandemic.”  During 15 months of the nearly 19-month Covid-19 pandemic, more than 120,000 U.S. children lost a parent or grandparent who was a primary provider of financial support and care, the study found.  Another 22,000 children experienced the death of a secondary caregiver.  Researchers estimate the Covid-19 drove a 15% increase in orphaned children, many requiring foster care.  About 32% of all kids who lost a primary caregiver were Hispanic, and 26% were Black.  Hispanic and Black Americans make up much smaller percentages of the population than that.  White children accounted for 35% of kids who lost primary caregivers, even though more than half of the population is white.

383. Other nations are dealing with vaccine mandates in similar ways.

         Q:  Are other countries mandating Covid-19 vaccines like we are?

         A:  Reuters News Service last week published a summary of how several other countries are requiring their citizens to be vaccinated.  In the past, nearly everyone accepted the premise of public health – that the inconvenience for some taking mitigation steps against infectious disease was valued as a protection of the community – the public health.  The Covid-19 pandemic in the U.S. saw an emerging counter to that premise by large numbers of people agitating, demonstrating, even taking violent action to “preserve their personal freedom,” and refusing getting their shots.  It turns out that many other nations are facing similar opposition, requiring alternative steps to achieve an effective level of immunity in the population.

Countries that have mandated vaccinations:

  • For everyone (over age 18) – Indonesia, Micronesia, Turkmenistan.
  • For all workers, or workers in companies over an identified number of employees – Italy, Kazakhstan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, United States.
  • For all healthcare workers – Britain, France, Greece, Hungary.
  • For all nationally/federally employed persons – Canada, Costa Rica, Fiji, United States.
  • For workers and passengers on planes, trains and marine transportation – Canada, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Turkey.
  • For those caring for the elderly – Australia, Tasmania.
  • For patrons entering restaurants, cinemas and other venues – Britain. Canada, Greece, Lebanon, Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland.
  • For school teachers, staff and/or students – Turkey.

For some of these categories, the United States is encouraging state and local jurisdictions, such as school boards corporations and community officials to create the mandates.  The diversity of effort internationally requires anyone traveling to a foreign country to check ahead of time to determine the current requirements for visitors.

384. Over 5,000 college students in Connecticut do not have to be vaccinated.

        Q:  How many Connecticut college students have been granted non-medical exemptions?

        A:  The Hartford Courant published an article this last Sunday that reported that 15% of the 37,116 students currently enrolled at Connecticut community colleges have received non-medical exemptions from being vaccinated.  These 5,479 students are all eligible for receiving a vaccination and have no medical condition preventing this.  But they do not have to get their shots.  The form the students were required to fill out before registering asked simply if they preferred to receive a medical or non-medical exemption.  No explanation was given as to limitations or definitions of a non-medical exemption.  Those not wanting a vaccine, or just not wanting to exert the effort to get one, were thus able to be excused.  Of course, this reduces the number of vaccinated people in the state and increases the risk to others who aren’t vaccinated, and for “breakout” infections to those who are.  Leadership is working to educate the non-medically exempt people to encourage them to get vaccinated anyway.  A review of this process may lead to a revision this winter as the second-semester registrations begin.

385. Iranians turn to Black Market for vaccines as Covid-19 deaths spiral upward.

         Q:  Are there countries that are not getting enough vaccine doses to meet their demand?

         A:  One interesting case study is worth reviewing.  In January, 2021, Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei suddenly announced that foreign-made Covid-19 vaccines were “forbidden” as they were “completely untrustworthy.”  Nine months later, the country is suffering its greatest surge and a record number of deaths per day.  The nation’s healthcare system is near collapse.  Patients are told to stay home if they became ill. And “do what they can to not get exposed,” said one hospital physician in Tehran.  The scale of the crisis is such that doctors feel they have no choice but to speak out about it openly.  This is a regime that ordinarily does not tolerate dissent.

Since the early days of the pandemic, Iranian officials have declined to cooperate with the World Health Organization.  Added to this are the crippling sanctions levied against Iran that have starved the nation’s healthcare system of resources.  As a result, foreign transactions with Europe and other countries are hampered.  With less than 5% of its 80 million population fully vaccinated, Covid-19 has been surging rapidly out of control.  In August, Khamenei partly reversed his mandate, although he still forbids vaccines produced by the United States and the United Kingdom.  This opened up a lucrative and corrupt black market for vaccines that are only affordable to the well-off.  The drugs can cost the equivalent of $400 – $1,200 per dose (when the average monthly salary is between $150 – $250).

A “corrupt medical mafia” has emerged as the country is dealing with a “scarcity of everything.”  Many lay blame at the foot of the repressive national government, but with its aggressive reaction to dissent, there is little that can be done as the pandemic rages out of control.

“Flipping on the Hive Switch” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, October 17, 2021

Gathering Music (Mary Bopp) (Begins at 9:50)

Welcome and Announcements (Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Centering

Prelude

Chalice Lighting

Opening Words and Chant

 “Turn Scarlet, Leaves!”
words by Raymond J. Baughan
#485 in Singing the Living Tradition
music by Mary Bopp
led by Rev. Josh Pawelek

Turn scarlet, leaves! Spin earth!
Tumble the shadows into dawn
Tumble the shadows into dawn

Opening Hymn 

“There is More Love Somewhere”
African American Hymn
#95 in Singing the Living Tradition
led by Rev. Josh Pawelek

There is more love somewhere.
There is more love somewhere.
I’m gonna keep on ‘til I find it.
There is more love somewhere.

There is more hope somewhere…

There is more peace somewhere…

There is more joy somewhere…

Meditation

“In Gatherings”
by Rev. Marta Valentín
from Becoming: A Spiritual Guide for Navigating Adulthood, ed. by Kayla Parker

Musical Meditation (Mary Bopp)

Joys and Concerns

Musical Meditation (Mary Bopp)

Offering

The recipient of our community outreach offering is the University of Connecticut’s Native American Cultural Program or NACP. NACP provides resources, services and community for UCONN’s Native and Indigenous students and faculty, helps foster relationships with local tribal nations, and works towards building good relations between UCONN and the land.

Offering Music

“Get Together”
by the Youngbloods
performed by Pat Eaton-Robb

Reading
excerpt from The Extended Mind
by Annie Murphy Paul

Sermon “Flipping on the Hive Switch” (Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Closing Hymn

“Come Sing a Song With Me”
words and music by Carolyn McDade
led by Rev. Josh Pawelek

Come, sing a song with me,
come, sing a song with me,
come, sing a song with me,
that I might know your mind.

Chorus:
And I’ll bring you hope
when hope is hard to find,
and I’ll bring a song of love
and a rose in the wintertime.

Come, dream a dream with me,
come, dream a dream with me,
come, dream a dream with me,
that I might know your mind.

(Chorus)

Come, walk in rain with me,
come, walk in rain with me,
come, walk in rain with me,
that I might know your mind.

(Chorus)

Come, share a rose with me,
come, share a rose with me,
come, share a rose with me,
that I might know your mind.

(Chorus)

Extinguishing the Chalice

Closing Circle

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Postlude

Virtual Coffee Hour and Zoom Breakout Rooms

“Forgiveness” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, September 26, 2021

Gathering Music – Mary Bopp, Director of Music (starts at 9:50)

Welcome and Announcements – Marsha Howland, Co-Chair, Sunday Services Committee

Centering

Prelude – “I Know This Rose Will Open” (by Mary E. Grigolia, arr. by Mary Bopp) – Mary Bopp

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

Opening Hymn

“Return Again”
Words and Music by Shlomo Carlebach
#1011 in Singing the Journey
Led by Sandy Johnson

Return again, Return again,
Return to the home of your soul.

Return to who you are,
Return to what you are,
Return to where you are
born and reborn again.

Joys and Concerns

Introduction to the Service

First Reading:

“Coffee?” An Allegory
author unknown
Read by David Garnes

First Speaker:  Deb Dauphinais

Musical Meditation

Offering

Offering Music

“I Hope You Dance”
By Mark D. Sanders and Tia Sillers
Performed by Sandy Johnson and Deb Dauphinais

Second Reading:

Thoughts about Forgiveness
Read by David Garnes

Second Speaker:  Elizabeth Thomas

Closing Hymn:

“Love Will Guide Us”
#131 in Singing the Living Tradition
Led by Sandy Johnson

Love will guide us, peace has tried us,
hope inside us will lead the way
on the road from greed to giving.
Love will guide us through the hard night.

If you cannot sing like angels,
if you cannot speak before thousands,
you can give from deep within you.
You can change the world with your love.

Love will guide us, peace has tried us,
hope inside us will lead the way
on the road from greed to giving.
Love will guide us through the hard night.

Extinguishing the Chalice and Closing Words

Closing Circle

Postlude

Breakout Rooms

 

 

“Embracing Possibility” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, September 12, 2021

Gathering Music (Mary Bopp, UUS:E Director of Music) (begins at 9:50 AM)

Welcome (Gina Campellone, UUS:E Director of Religious Education)

Announcements (Rev. Josh Pawelek, UUS:E minister)

Centering (Gina Campellone)

Prelude  

“All Possibility”
performed by members of the Manchester Women’s Sacred Singing Circle

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

“We Light This Chalice to Embrace Possibility”
by Robin Slaw
spoken by Mazzlyn Stevenson

Opening Hymn

“Meditation on Breathing”
by Sarah Dan Jones
#1009 in Singing the Journey
led by Jeannette LeSure

 

When I breathe in,
I’ll breathe in peace.
When I breathe out,
I’ll breathe out love.

Blessing of the Backpacks  (Gina Campellone)

May your mask keep you safe
And your light always be seen.
May you learn and grow each day,
In person or on your screen.
May your hearts and minds journey
And discover what is true.
But most of all, may you know you
Are loved – simply for being you.

BACK to SCHOOL Slide Show

Joys and Concerns

Musical Meditation (Mary Bopp)

Offering

For the month of September, our Community Outreach offering will be shared by two organizations:

Power Up is a new Black Lives Matter organization in Manchester. They are courageously bringing much needed visibility to the ongoing realities of racism in Manchester and surrounding communities. Some UUS:E members and friends have participated in Power Up’s daily rallies and other actions.

KIDSAFE CT is dedicated to the early intervention, prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect in the towns east of the Connecticut River in Hartford and Tolland Counties. Their mission is to “partner with the community to educate and empower families and promote the well-being of young people.” Their work has continued during the pandemic, though their staff is working from home.

Offertory

“Accentuate the Positive”
by Harold Arlen
performed by Chris Crossgrove and Shoshana Levinson

Story and Song

“Maybe Yes, Maybe No”
(Chinese fable)
told by Lea Morris
“Whatever Comes Next”
written and performed by Lea Morris

Reflection “On Possibility” (Gina Campellone and Rev. Josh Pawelek)

Closing Hymn

“Spirit of Life”
by Carolyn McDade
#123 in Singing the Living Tradition
led by Jeannette LeSure

Spirit of Life, come unto me.
Sing in my heart all the stirrings of compassion.
Blow in the wind, rise in the sea;
move in the hand, giving life the shape of justice.
Roots hold me close; wings set me free;
Spirit of Life, come to me, come to me.

Extinguishing the Chalice

Closing Circle

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Coffee Hour / Breakout Rooms

 

 

Public Health Metrics Used to Guide Opening, Closing and Using the Meeting House for Indoor Events

(Adopted August 17th, 2021)

Background: The UUS:E Policy Board has charged the Emergency Preparedness Team to develop procedures to safely reopen, close and use the meeting house. This was to be done using scientific data to provide guideposts to measure and predict an acceptable level of risk to all members, staff and guests.

The Emergency Preparedness Team has recommended, and the Policy Board has accepted, the following guidance for evaluating the continued reopening and using the meeting house safely.

1. The Unitarian Universalist Society: East (UUS:E) will use the resources developed by Covid Act Now, an independent, national non-profit coalition created to provide COVID-19 predictive data analysis. This group is a consortium of multidisciplinary experts including technologists, epidemiologist, health experts and public policy leaders from Georgetown and Stanford Universities. The data is updated daily to display real-time information. Predictive trends are calculated for important indicators to assess the current relative risks of COVID-19. In a word, this resource identifies the information needed, and the data required, for any group to determine when it might be safe to reopen. (Visit www.covidactnow.org and find the data for Connecticut.)

2. Covid Act Now has identified five data trends as being advisory or predictive of when a safe (or safer) environment might emerge. These data sets will be tracked by UUS:E’s Emergency Preparedness Team to monitor the reduction of the COVID-19 threat to an acceptable level of risk.

  1. The following metrics will be used to evaluate the continued safe reopening at varying levels of increased risk designated by covidactnow.org’s graphs for each metric.

 

Mandatory metric 1. “Daily New Cases per 100,000 population” for 5 consecutive days:
– Green – Low – at or below 1
– Yellow – Medium – above 1 to 10
– Orange – High – above 10 to 25
– Red – Critical – above 25 to 75

Mandatory metric 2: “Infection Rate” for 5 consecutive days:
– Green – Low – at or below .9
– Yellow – Medium – above .9 to 1.1
– Orange – High – above 1.1 to 1.4
– Red – Critical – above 1.4 to 2.0

Advisory metric 1: “Positive Test Rate” for advisory use only without setting a threshold to initiate additional mitigations.

Advisory metric 2: “ICU Capacity for advisory use only without setting a threshold to initiate additional mitigations.

Advisory metric 3: “Percent Fully vaccinated.” for advisory use only without setting a threshold to initiate additional mitigations.

The UUS:E Policy Board will use these public health metrics to evaluate when and how it is safe to continue reopening the meeting house safely. Depending on the level of risk indicated by the two mandatory metrics, the UUS:E Policy Board could consider the following Mitigation Options in addition to other mitigation steps it might consider. This list is in categories (such as Mask Wearing, Social Distancing, etc.) and is in increasing order of risk reduction with the least restrictive at the top of each category:

Mask Wearing (bullet points from least restrictive to most restrictive)
* Vaccinated people with consent of others can remove masks
* All persons gathered in the building must wear masks (currently in place)
Note: Sunday service speakers and singers on the chancel may remove masks.

Social Distancing at gatherings (bullet points from least restrictive to most restrictive)
* 6 feet apart (currently in place)
* Consider different spacing in identified rooms

Number of people at gatherings (bullet points from least restrictive to most restrictive)
* Unlimited # of people (for hybrid services and RE program)
* 15 for Sunday Services (currently in place, with RE currently conducted outdoors)
* Outside groups (e.g., AA) (currently no limit)
* Impose further limits, such as outside groups limited to 15.

Building Closure
* Close the building for two weeks with an ongoing assessment (Default: reopen unless decision made to remain closed)
* Close the building long term. Reopen and remove restrictions at any time the diminishing metrics reach the point where the restrictions were imposed.

Consumption of food and drink (ie, Sunday morning hospitality, receptions or memorial services)
* Meals and drinks allowed
* Snacks and coffee / drinks allowed
* Only coffee / drinks allowed
* Not allowed (currently in place)

“How I Found Unitarian Universalism/UUS:E and Why I Stay” — UUS:E Virtual Worship, July 11, 2021

Gathering Music  (Mary Bopp) (starts at 9:50)

Welcome and Announcements  (Alan Ayers, member of the Sunday Services Committee)

Centering  (Marsha Howland, member of the Sunday Services Committee)

Prelude 

“Bridge Over Troubled Water”
by Paul Simon
performed by Alan and Kathy Ayers and Mary Bopp

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

Opening Hymn 

“May Nothing Evil Cross this Door”
Words by Louis Untermeyer
Music by Robert N. Quaile
#1 in Singing the Living Tradition
led by Jeannine Westbrook

May nothing evil cross this door,
and may ill fortune never pry about
these windows; may the roar
and rain go by.

By faith made strong, the rafters will
withstand the battering of the storm.
This hearth, though all the world grow chill,
will keep you warm.

Peace shall walk softly through these rooms,
touching our lips with holy wine,
till every casual corner blooms
into a shrine.

With laughter drown the raucous shout,
and, though these sheltering walls are thin,
may they be strong to keep hate out
and hold love in.

Introduction to the Service

First Reading:

From “Constellations of our Lives”
by Karen G. Johnston
read by Marsha Howland

First Speaker: Maureen Flanagan

Musical Meditation

Joys and Concerns 

Musical Meditation

Offering  

The recipients of our July outreach offering are the three area food banks serving residents in towns including Manchester, East Hartford, Ellington, South Windsor, Tolland and Vernon. They are MACC Food Bank, Hockanum Valley Food Pantry, and CT Mutual Aid East of the River Food Pantry.

Offering Music

“I Believe”
by Ervin Drake, Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl and Al Stillman
performed by Alan Ayers

Second Speaker: Rob Stolzman

Musical Meditation

Third Speaker: Marsha Howland

Second Reading:

“I Want to Be with People”
by Dana E. Worsnop
read by Marsha Howland

Closing Hymn 

“Go Lifted Up”
by Mortimer B. Barron
#1057 in Singing the Journey
led by Jeannine Westbrook

Go lifted up,
Love bless your way,
moonlight, starlight
guide your journey
into peace
and the brightness of day.

Extinguishing the Chalice and Closing Words 

Closing Circle 

May faith in the spirit of life
And hope for the community of earth
And love of the light in each other
Be ours now, and in all the days to come.

Postlude

Breakout Rooms